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hurriyetdailynews.com
‘Lightyear’ banned in 14 markets
Lightyear,” which features a same-sex kiss, has been denied release in more than a dozen mainly Muslim countries.Countries across Asia and the Middle East have refused to give Pixar’s “Toy Story” spinoff a showing, in the latest development for parent company Disney as it tries to navigate differing public and political attitudes on LGBTQ issues.Regulators in the United Arab Emirates this week announced they were banning the movie for “violation of the country’s media content standards,” tweeting a picture of titular hero Buzz Lightyear in a red “No” symbol.Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim-majority country, said it had not banned the film, “but suggested the owner of the movie think about their audience in Indonesia where an LGBT kissing scene is still considered sensitive.”Rommy Fibri Hardiyanto, head of Indonesia’s censoring office overseen by the Ministry of Education and Culture, told AFP that Disney has not offered a re-cut version of “Lightyear.”In neighboring Malaysia, the Film Censorship Board said if cuts were not made the film would not be screened in the country.“It is not appropriate to show the two scenes, and they are not suitable to be viewed by children,” an official, who declined to be named, told AFP.Disney is understood to have declined to make any cuts, offering the film “as is” in all markets.As a result, a total of 14 countries and territories where the company wanted to show “Lightyear” have not granted the film a release, AFP has learned.The others are: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, the Palestinian Territories, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Syria.“Lightyear” tells the backstory of the main character from the hit franchise “Toy Story,” an action figure who believes he is
starobserver.com.au
Gay Film Sparks Outrage In Egypt
Conservative Egyptians are once again in an uproar over a critically acclaimed new film, by a Queer Egyptian filmmaker, which explores gay relationships and polyamory.Bashtaalak sa’at (Shall I Compare You to a Summer’s Day?), which premiered at the 72nd Berlin Film Festival this month, has been the target of angry critics who accuse the director, Mohammad Shawky Hassan, of “promoting homosexuality.”Omar Abdel Aziz, the head of the Federation of Art Syndicates, told Al-Watan that the film “highlights the worst of us.”The outrage over the film has led to one Egyptian lawyer, Ayman Mahfouz, demanding that Hassan be stripped of his Egyptian citizenship.The film, a German-Egyptian-Lebanese co-production, was nominated for the GWFF Award for Best First Feature, as well as a Teddy Award for Best Feature Film at the Berlinale.Hassan, who wrote and directed Bashtaalak sa’at, shot the film entirely in Berlin with a largely Egyptian cast, including Ahmed Awadalla, Nadim Bahsounn, Hassan Dib, Donia Massoud and Ahmed El Gendy.Bashtaalak sa’at (Shall I Compare You to a Summer’s Day?)Film critic Tarek El Shinnawi  in an interview with El-Kahera Wal Nas said, “Apart from the fact that some actors speak in the Egyptian dialect in the movie, the setting is unidentified,” and the film “neither positively or negatively tackles homosexuality.”While it is unlikely that the film will be screened in Egypt due to its sexual content and strong censorship in the country, Bashtaalak sa’at has yet to be formally banned by the Egyptian government.Bashtaalak sa’at (Shall I Compare You to a Summer’s Day?)According to the Arabic website Fil Fan, “The film will not be shown commercially in Egypt for several reasons, the first of which is the
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